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Section 504 – Rehabilitation Act « Education – Special

Section 504 image

 

Government Information,
Articles & Publications
About Section 504 of The Rehabilitation Act

 

Government Information About Section 504:

  • Auxiliary Aids and Services for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities (US Dept. of Education)
    Higher education's obligations under Section 504 and Title II of the ADA.
  • Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) (Ed.gov)
    The Section 504 regulation requires a school district to provide a “free appropriate public education” (FAPE) to each qualified person with a disability who is in the school district’s jurisdiction, regardless of the nature or severity of the person’s disability.
  • Protecting Students with Disabilities (U.S. Dept. of Education)
    Frequently asked questions about Section 504.
  • Prohibited Disability Harassment (U.S. Dept. of Education)
    Reminder of responsibilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  • Q&A on Disability Discrimination under Section 504 and Title II (Ed.gov)
    The main difference between Section 504 and Title II is that  one applies to the recipients of grants from the federal government (Section 504) and the other applies only to public entities (Title II). A school or college may be both a recipient of Federal funds from the US Department of Education and also a public entity. In such cases, the institution is covered by both laws.
  • The Rehabilitation Act (Ed.gov)
    The Act includes a variety of provisions focused on rights, advocacy and protections for individuals with disabilities.
  • Your Rights Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services)
    The nondiscrimination requirements of the law apply to employers and organizations that receive financial assistance from any Federal department or agency, including the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). These organizations and employers include many hospitals, nursing homes, mental health centers and human service programs.

Articles and Publications About Section 504:

  • A Parent's Guide to Section 504 in Public Schools (Great Schools.org)
    This article attempts to answer basic questions pertaining to the implementation of Section 504 in public school systems.
  • Big Changes to §504: Do They Affect Special Education – Part I (Special Education Law Blog – 8/16/10)
    The big question is how much these changes will affect the education of kids with disabilities.
  • Learn About Section 504 (About.com)
    If your child has a learning disability, depending on the degree of severity, his school may consider serving him in a special education program or providing adaptations and accommodations under Section 504. Learn more about Section 504 and whether it may be appropriate for your child.
  • Overview of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Sections 504 and 508) (WebAim)
    The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 was the first major legislative effort to secure an equal playing field for individuals with disabilities. This legislation provides a wide range of services for persons with physical and cognitive disabilities. Those disabilities can create significant barriers to full and continued employment, the pursuit of independent living, self-determination, and inclusion in American society. The Rehabilitation Act has been amended twice since its inception, once in 1993 and again in 1998. The Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) administers the Act.
  • Remember that 504 Requires Manifestation Determinations for Students Even Though They May NOT be Eligible Under the IDEA (Ability Law Blog – 3-2-11)
    In Springfield School District #186, 55 IDELR 206 (OCR June 29, 2010), the Office for Civil Rights determined that a school district violated Section 504 when it expelled a 7th Grader with ADHD without conducting a manifestation determination.
  • Section 504 Complaint Process (Sniderlaw.com)
    An overview of how HUD processes complaints filed by individuals who have experienced disability discrimination under the law called Section 504.
  • The Differences Between 504 Plans & IEPs (KPS4Parents – 12/27/10)
    KPS4Parents assists parents pursue a Free and Appropriate Public Education (“FAPE”) for children who need IEPs or 504 Plans. We help in both venues. Most of the families we serve are involved in the special education process, which calls for an Individualized Education Plan (“IEP”), but we still have a few who are not eligible for an IEP but are eligible for a 504 Plan. Many parents and educators struggle to understand the difference between these two types of legally binding and enforceable documents, so today’s post/podcast is meant to explain how they are similar and how they are different.
  • The Freedom Stick and "Massive Resistance" (SpeEdChange – 5/17/11)
    In 1994 the United States government added the requirement to "Section 504" that all schools which receive "any federal funds" have accessible computers available, and a system of in place for information and communications technology which would offer students with "disabilities" real time access "equivalently."
    Patti's Comment: This is a GREAT post with resources that are wonderful for students with challenges.
  • The Public School's Special Education System as an Assistive Technology Funding Source: The Cutting Edge (Neighborhood Legal Services)
    The public school's special education system is a source of a wide range of educational services, special supports, and even AT that may be needed by children with disabilities to benefit from the public school's educational system. These rights to educational services and supports are grounded in two federal statutes, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, that have each been in place for more than 20 years. Both the IDEA and section 504's educational mandates have been implemented by a comprehensive set of federal regulations and through a number of policy interpretations issued through the U.S. Department of Education.